News from the Heart Land

Sleep problems atrial fibrillation insomnia heartcurrents

Poor Sleep Linked to Increased Atrial Fibrillation

People diagnosed with insomnia had a 29 percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation compared to those without insomnia. PsychCentral Rick Nauert PhD Preliminary research suggests disruptions in sleep may raise the risk of an irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation (AF). Clinicians have known that obstructive sleep apnea, or sleep interrupted by pauses in breathing, is a known risk for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to strokes, heart failure and other heart-related complications.… … Keep Reading

Dificulty sleeping heart problems heartcurrents

Sleep Problems and Heart Disease

Short sleep — less than six hours per night — appears to be especially hazardous to your heart health. Harvard Heart Letter  September 2017 Irregular or insufficient sleep increases your risk of cardiovascular disease. If you’re one of the many people who toss and turn nightly, you already know that a bout of sleeplessness can hamper your productivity and sap your quality of life. But the ramifications of poor sleep extend far beyond a cranky mood. Research shows that an… … Keep Reading

Synthetic Cannabis-like Drug Reduces Sleep Apnea

Six weeks of treatment by the highest dose of dronabinol (10 milligrams) was associated with a lower frequency of apneas or hypopneas (overly shallow breathing) during sleep. Science Daily November 28, 2017 A synthetic cannabis-like drug in a pill was safe and effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in the first large multi-site study of a drug for apnea funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study was conducted at Northwestern Medicine and the University of Illinois at Chicago… … Keep Reading

stress pencil cortisol heart attack risk

Cortisol Levels Link Stress to Cardiac Risk

An elevated cortisol response to mental stress was linked to higher cardiac troponin T levels, suggesting that cortisol over-reactivity might explain why some people are more likely to develop heart disease.   MedPage Today June 27, 2013 Paul Cerrato,   Action Points This study evaluated the relationship between salivary cortisol response and cardiac troponin T plasma concentration in healthy older adults undergoing standardized mental stress tests. There was a significant association between heightened cortisol response to mental stress and detectable… … Keep Reading

Exercise Versus Statins for Reducing Heart Disease

IF you start taking a statin aged fifty, and keep taking it religiously for thirty years, you could expect to live for an extra: 6 x 4 days = 24 days. Or a bit less than a month. You may think this is worthwhile, you may not. This, by the way is the best-case scenario. On the other hand, it has been estimated that if you take regular exercise, you could live for an extra four and a half years.… … Keep Reading

Stamp outline vitamin b12 heartcurents

Mayo Clinic: Can taking Vitamin B12 Prevent Heart Disease?

There’s no evidence to show that vitamin B-12 supplements prevent heart disease. Mayo Clinic Staff Overview Vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) is a water-soluble vitamin that plays essential roles in red blood cell formation, cell metabolism, nerve function and the production of DNA. Food sources of vitamin B-12 include poultry, meat, fish and dairy products. Vitamin B-12 is also added to some foods and is available as an oral supplement. Vitamin B-12 injections or nasal spray might be prescribed to treat vitamin… … Keep Reading

Pill vitamin D heart disease

Benefits of Vitamin D Still Debated

Whether supplementation with vitamin D can help people live longer and healthier requires more study.   Harvard Health Blog Howard LeWine, M.D April 4, 2014 Two reports published this week in the journal BMJ weren’t exactly an April Fool’s Day message about vitamin D, but they came close. For the past few years, vitamin D has been gaining a reputation—not entirely earned—as a wonder vitamin that offers protection against some cancers, bone-weakening osteoporosis, heart attack, Alzheimer’s disease, and other chronic conditions. Not… … Keep Reading

bottle of vitamin d heart attacks heartcurrents

Vitamin D, Health and Heart Disease

Harvard School of Public Health Men who were deficient in vitamin D were twice as likely to have a heart attack as men who had adequate levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D Deficiency: A Global Concern If you live north of the line connecting San Francisco to Philadelphia and Athens to Beijing, odds are that you don’t get enough vitamin D. The same holds true if you don’t get outside for at least a 15-minute daily walk in the sun.… … Keep Reading

early morning heart attacks more dangerous heartcurents

More Severe Heart Attacks Happen in the Morning

Patients whose heart attacks occurred between 6 a.m. and noon had 21% higher creatine kinawse and tropoin levels than patients whose heart attacks occurred between midnight and 6 a.m.   —Web MD — April 27, 2011 — The most common time of day for heart attacks is the morning, and now new research suggests that morning heart attacks are also the most serious. Heart attacks occurring between 6 a.m. and noon were associated with the most the damage in the… … Keep Reading

sunlight on skin nitric oxide heartcurrents

Is Sunlight Good for Our Heart?

We suggest that the skin is a significant store of nitric oxide (NO)-related species that can be mobilized by sunlight and delivered to the systemic circulation to exert coronary vasodilator and cardioprotective as well as antihypertensive effects. European Heart Journal March 10, 2010 Is Sunlight Good for Our Heart? Introduction Humans evolved being exposed for about half of the day to the light of the sun. Nowadays, exposure to sunlight is actively discouraged for fear of skin cancer, and contemporary… … Keep Reading

image of globe latitude lines blood pressure heartcurrents

Blood Pressure Increases with Latitude

The rate of high blood pressure among people who resided in the south of Chile was more than 8 percent higher than in the north. LiveScience –Cari Nierenberg –May 18, 2016– The Weird Way Your Latitude May Affect Your Blood Pressure The distance people live from the equator may influence their blood pressure, a new study suggests. Researchers found that people in Chile who lived at greater distances from the equator had higher average blood-pressure levels compared with people who… … Keep Reading

heart attack ptsd one in eight

Heart Attacks Can Cause PTSD

Harvard Health Blog June 25, 2012 Holly Strawbridge Heart attack can trigger PTSD A heart attack is a life-changing event. For some people, surviving a heart attack brings renewed appreciation for life. For others, the event is so traumatic that worrying about having a second heart attack consumes their lives. By the latest account, 1 in 8 heart-attack survivors experiences a reaction that might be called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although PTSD is usually associated with extreme trauma such as… … Keep Reading

rose hips to reduce blood pressure heart disease

Rose Hips for Reducing Blood Pressure

Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease was decreased by 17% in the rose hip group compared to the control group Life Extension (Originally in Nature) Michael Smith, M.D. Despite pharmaceutical profits of billions of dollars on heart medications, heart disease is still our number one killer. Although that topic is probably better suited for its own blog post, it sets the perfect stage for what we’re going to talk about here: a new study that explores the range of potential… … Keep Reading

Hibiscus tea to reduce blood pressure heartcurrents

Hibiscus Tea Can Lower Blood Pressure

The volunteers who drank hibiscus tea had a 7.2 point drop in their systolic blood pressure, compared to a 1.3 point drop in the volunteers who drank the placebo beverage United State Department of Agriculture –Rosalie Marion Bliss –November 10, 2008 Study Shows Consuming Hibiscus Tea Lowers Blood Pressure Drinking hibiscus tea lowered blood pressure in a group of pre-hypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults, according to a report being presented today by nutrition scientist Diane McKay at the American Heart… … Keep Reading

spices increase heart health

Spices and Heart Health

Cinnamon contains cinnamaldehyde, a phytochemical that may fight viruses, lower blood sugar and ward off diabetes, lower cholesterol, and protect against neurodegenerative diseases Harvard Health Letter February 2016 Can everyday spices make you healthier? The health benefits of foods such as berries, broccoli, and salmon are well known. But your kitchen’s spice rack may also hold some secret weapons against conditions such as inflammation, heart disease, cancer, and more. “Spices are underused, but it would be very easy to take… … Keep Reading

ginger consumption heart disease

Ginger and the Reduction of Heart Disease

Overall, daily ginger consumption was associated with decreased risk for hypertension. Nutrition Volume 36, April 2017, Pages 79-84 Highlights Ginger has a potential preventive property against hypertension and coronary heart disease. he probability of illness decreased when the level of daily ginger intake increased. We provided a preliminary suggestion that daily intake of 2 to 4 g/d of ginger might prevent chronic diseases.   Abstract Objectives The aim of this study was to assess daily ginger consumption and explore its… … Keep Reading

Swiss cheese heart disease heartcurrents

Cheese Consumption and Heart Disease

Overall, people who consumed high levels of cheese had a 14% lower risk of developing coronary heart disease and were 10% less likely to have a stroke than those who rarely or never ate cheese. Time Magazine Amanda McMillan December 5, 2017 Cheese is typically considered more of an indulgence than a health food, but a new review of research suggests that it may not be as bad for you as once thought. In fact, people in the analysis who… … Keep Reading

Sudafed hypertension avoid heartcurrents

What Cold Medications are Safe for the Heart? (–Not Sudafed)

Take anything that does not contain pseudoephedrine. The Skeptical Cardiologist What Cold Medications are Safe for My Heart? February 1, 2015 It’s the cold and flu season here in St. Louis. That means the beds in my hospital are filling up with people who have upper respiratory infections of one kind or another and have developed complications. Not uncommonly, the skeptical cardiologist is asked to consult on one of his heart patients who has developed worsening heart failure or atrial… … Keep Reading

z-max heart mortality danger heartcurrents

Using Azithromycin (Z-Pak) Increases Risk of Heart Problems

  People taking azithromycin have a 2.5-fold increased chance of heart-related death within five days of starting a Z-Pak, compared to people taking the antibiotic amoxicillin. Harvard Health Blog Heidi Godman May 24, 1012 Z-Pak users: be on the alert for heart-rhythm problems If you’ve battled bronchitis or endured an ear infection, chances are good you were prescribed the antibiotic azithromycin (Zithromax), which is commonly available in a five-day dose known as the Z-Pak. But a recent study suggests that… … Keep Reading

Triglyceride Levels and Cardiovascular Risk

Triglyceride levels above 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. Harvard Men’s Heath Watch –June, 2015 Know your triglycerides: The level of triglycerides in the blood, like measurements of “bad” cholesterol, helps to gauge your risk for heart disease. High levels of these fatty particles in the blood means you may need to step up healthy lifestyle changes. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol, invades the artery walls and causes atherosclerosis, the buildup of fatty… … Keep Reading

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Triglycerides in Heart Disease

Recent studies suggest that among patients with coronary artery disease who are on intensive statin treatment and have optimal levels of LDL cholesterol, triglyceride levels remain a significant predictor of residual risk. from Doc’s Opinion: Axel F. Sigurdsson MD. December 27, 2017 Triglycerides – An Overview of the Role of Triglycerides in Heart Disease As we grow older, we become more and more likely to develop heart disease. Obviously, we don’t think about it much in our twenties and thirties… … Keep Reading

image of butter related to cholesterol

Cholesterol and Heart Disease

For every 1 percent you reduce your cholesterol level, you reduce your risk of heart disease by 2 percent. Source: Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine Nearly 2,200 Americans die of cardiovascular disease daily, with an average of one death occurring every 40 seconds. An estimated 7.1 million Americans have experienced a heart attack during their lifetimes. Those who survive a heart attack often go on to have another. More than 7 percent of Americans have some type of cardiovascular disease,… … Keep Reading

Is It Safe to Take Low Does Aspirin?

Harvard Men’s Health Watch October, 2012 Is low-dose aspirin safe for you? If you take daily aspirin, make sure you know why and understand the small but real bleeding risk. Are you taking an aspirin a day to keep the cardiologist away? If so, you are among millions of Americans taking a daily dose of the cheap, widely available anti-inflammatory drug for “primary prevention” of cardiovascular disease. Primary prevention means you don’t have cardiovascular disease, and hope that aspirin will… … Keep Reading

Pain Killers nsaid heart attack risk

Pain Killers and Heart Attack Risk

Compared with people who didn’t take NSAIDs, those who did had 20% to 50% higher odds of having a heart attack while taking the drugs. Harvard Heart Letter August, 2017 Heart attack risk may rise within a week of taking daily high doses of certain over-the-counter pain relievers, according to a new study. Previous research has linked the use of pain relievers known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to a heightened risk of heart attack. The new report, published in… … Keep Reading

lung icon respiratory illness heart attacks

Heart Attack Risk Increases with Respiratory Infections

The risk of having a heart attack is 17 times higher in the seven days following a respiratory infection. Science Daily May 15, 2017 Heart attack risk increases 17-fold following respiratory infections The risk of having a heart attack is 17 times higher in the seven days following a respiratory infection, research has found. The increased risk peaks in the first 7 days and gradually reduces but remains elevated for one month. Published in Internal Medicine Journal, this is the… … Keep Reading

danger heart attack and stroke risk with anger

Anger, Heart Attack and Strokes

Although the risk of experiencing an acute cardiovascular event with any single outburst of anger is relatively low, the risk can accumulate for people with frequent episodes of anger. Harvard School of Public Health March, 2014 Angry outbursts appear to boost heart attack, stroke risk People who have angry outbursts appear to be at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, especially within the first two hours of an outburst, according to a study by Harvard School of Public Health… … Keep Reading

couple arguing heart attack anger heartcurrents

Intense Anger Increases Risk of Heart Attacks

Researchers found that in the 2 hours after a period of intense anger, the risk of heart attack may increase by 8.5 times. Medical News Today –February 25, 2017 –Honor Whiteman Angry outbursts may raise the risk of heart attack You have probably seen it in a number of films or TV shows: a character has an angry outburst before clutching their chest and falling to the ground – they are having a heart attack. But a new study shows… … Keep Reading

Pomegranates heart health heartcurrents

Pomegranates and Heart Health

Preliminary evidence suggests that drinking pomegranate juice every day may help lower systolic blood pressure. University of Maryland Medical Center Introduction Pomegranates have been used as medicine for thousands of years. More recently, they have been called a “superfood” that can protect against disease. In laboratory tests, pomegranate shows antiviral, antibacterial, and antioxidant properties. But more research is needed to determine whether it can help prevent or treat illness in humans. In addition, there is some concern that pomegranate juice… … Keep Reading

beet juice can increase endurance in heart failure patients

Beet Juice Can Increase Exercise Endurance in Heart Failure Patients

After analysis, researchers found that exercise endurance improved by 24% after one week of daily beetroot juice consumption. American College of Cardiology March 08, 2016 Nitrates in beet juice may help improve blood flow and exercise ability. A daily serving of beet juice may improve quality of life for heart failure patients, based on recent findings linking beetroot juice to blood pressure reductions and improved exercise endurance. Published in JACC: Heart Failure, this study tested the benefits of beet juice… … Keep Reading

Lutein as an anti-inflammatory for heart disease

Lutein and the Reduction of Chronic Inflammation

Our study confirms that one particular carotenoid, lutein, can suppress long-term inflammation in patients with coronary artery disease. Medical News Today –July 7, 2017 A new study finds that lutein, a compound that gives egg yolk and some plants their color, can reduce chronic inflammation in patients with coronary artery disease, the most common type of heart disease. Researchers have recently found that lutein, a compound found in egg yolk, can reduce inflammation levels among patients with heart disease. In… … Keep Reading

HEART CONDITIONS

Sleep problems atrial fibrillation insomnia heartcurrents

Poor Sleep Linked to Increased Atrial Fibrillation

People diagnosed with insomnia had a 29 percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation compared to those without insomnia. PsychCentral Rick Nauert PhD Preliminary research suggests disruptions in sleep may raise the risk of an irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation (AF). Clinicians have known that obstructive sleep apnea, or sleep interrupted by pauses in breathing, is a known risk for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to strokes, heart failure and other heart-related complications.… … Keep Reading

stress pencil cortisol heart attack risk

Cortisol Levels Link Stress to Cardiac Risk

An elevated cortisol response to mental stress was linked to higher cardiac troponin T levels, suggesting that cortisol over-reactivity might explain why some people are more likely to develop heart disease.   MedPage Today June 27, 2013 Paul Cerrato,   Action Points This study evaluated the relationship between salivary cortisol response and cardiac troponin T plasma concentration in healthy older adults undergoing standardized mental stress tests. There was a significant association between heightened cortisol response to mental stress and detectable… … Keep Reading

Exercise Versus Statins for Reducing Heart Disease

IF you start taking a statin aged fifty, and keep taking it religiously for thirty years, you could expect to live for an extra: 6 x 4 days = 24 days. Or a bit less than a month. You may think this is worthwhile, you may not. This, by the way is the best-case scenario. On the other hand, it has been estimated that if you take regular exercise, you could live for an extra four and a half years.… … Keep Reading

Pill vitamin D heart disease

Benefits of Vitamin D Still Debated

Whether supplementation with vitamin D can help people live longer and healthier requires more study.   Harvard Health Blog Howard LeWine, M.D April 4, 2014 Two reports published this week in the journal BMJ weren’t exactly an April Fool’s Day message about vitamin D, but they came close. For the past few years, vitamin D has been gaining a reputation—not entirely earned—as a wonder vitamin that offers protection against some cancers, bone-weakening osteoporosis, heart attack, Alzheimer’s disease, and other chronic conditions. Not… … Keep Reading

early morning heart attacks more dangerous heartcurents

More Severe Heart Attacks Happen in the Morning

Patients whose heart attacks occurred between 6 a.m. and noon had 21% higher creatine kinawse and tropoin levels than patients whose heart attacks occurred between midnight and 6 a.m.   —Web MD — April 27, 2011 — The most common time of day for heart attacks is the morning, and now new research suggests that morning heart attacks are also the most serious. Heart attacks occurring between 6 a.m. and noon were associated with the most the damage in the… … Keep Reading

sunlight on skin nitric oxide heartcurrents

Is Sunlight Good for Our Heart?

We suggest that the skin is a significant store of nitric oxide (NO)-related species that can be mobilized by sunlight and delivered to the systemic circulation to exert coronary vasodilator and cardioprotective as well as antihypertensive effects. European Heart Journal March 10, 2010 Is Sunlight Good for Our Heart? Introduction Humans evolved being exposed for about half of the day to the light of the sun. Nowadays, exposure to sunlight is actively discouraged for fear of skin cancer, and contemporary… … Keep Reading

MEDICATIONS

Sudafed hypertension avoid heartcurrents

What Cold Medications are Safe for the Heart? (–Not Sudafed)

Take anything that does not contain pseudoephedrine. The Skeptical Cardiologist What Cold Medications are Safe for My Heart? February 1, 2015 It’s the cold and flu season here in St. Louis. That means the beds in my hospital are filling up with people who have upper respiratory infections of one kind or another and have developed complications. Not uncommonly, the skeptical cardiologist is asked to consult on one of his heart patients who has developed worsening heart failure or atrial… … Keep Reading

z-max heart mortality danger heartcurrents

Using Azithromycin (Z-Pak) Increases Risk of Heart Problems

  People taking azithromycin have a 2.5-fold increased chance of heart-related death within five days of starting a Z-Pak, compared to people taking the antibiotic amoxicillin. Harvard Health Blog Heidi Godman May 24, 1012 Z-Pak users: be on the alert for heart-rhythm problems If you’ve battled bronchitis or endured an ear infection, chances are good you were prescribed the antibiotic azithromycin (Zithromax), which is commonly available in a five-day dose known as the Z-Pak. But a recent study suggests that… … Keep Reading

Is It Safe to Take Low Does Aspirin?

Harvard Men’s Health Watch October, 2012 Is low-dose aspirin safe for you? If you take daily aspirin, make sure you know why and understand the small but real bleeding risk. Are you taking an aspirin a day to keep the cardiologist away? If so, you are among millions of Americans taking a daily dose of the cheap, widely available anti-inflammatory drug for “primary prevention” of cardiovascular disease. Primary prevention means you don’t have cardiovascular disease, and hope that aspirin will… … Keep Reading

Pain Killers nsaid heart attack risk

Pain Killers and Heart Attack Risk

Compared with people who didn’t take NSAIDs, those who did had 20% to 50% higher odds of having a heart attack while taking the drugs. Harvard Heart Letter August, 2017 Heart attack risk may rise within a week of taking daily high doses of certain over-the-counter pain relievers, according to a new study. Previous research has linked the use of pain relievers known as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to a heightened risk of heart attack. The new report, published in… … Keep Reading

Comparing Blood-Thinners for Atrial Fibrillation

Apixaban [Eliquis] scores highest of all the NOACs, “on the balance of efficacy, safety and cost.” Pharmacy News December 5, 2017 Which NOAC scores highest for atrial fibrillation? New ranking may help guide decision-making Apixaban is the most efficient non-vitamin K oral anticoagulant (NOAC) for treating atrial fibrillation, according to the results of a meta-analysis including 95,000 patients from 23 randomised controlled trial. There’s already a large body of evidence that NOACs are at least as effective as warfarin and… … Keep Reading

FDA blood thinners

FDA: Atrial Fibrillation and New Oral Anticoagulant Drugs

From the US Food and Drug Administration October 2016 Ellis F. Unger, M.D. More than 3 million Americans have atrial fibrillation, a problem with the electrical system of the heart that causes an irregular heart rhythm. Atrial fibrillation can produce palpitations, shortness of breath, lightheadedness, weakness, and chest pain, or may occur without symptoms. The main concern, however, is that atrial fibrillation can lead to the formation of blood clots in the heart, which can travel to the brain and… … Keep Reading

Nutrition

Pill vitamin D heart disease

Benefits of Vitamin D Still Debated

Whether supplementation with vitamin D can help people live longer and healthier requires more study.   Harvard Health Blog Howard LeWine, M.D April 4, 2014 Two reports published this week in the journal BMJ weren’t exactly an April Fool’s Day message about vitamin D, but they came close. For the past few years, vitamin D has been gaining a reputation—not entirely earned—as a wonder vitamin that offers protection against some cancers, bone-weakening osteoporosis, heart attack, Alzheimer’s disease, and other chronic conditions. Not… … Keep Reading

bottle of vitamin d heart attacks heartcurrents

Vitamin D, Health and Heart Disease

Harvard School of Public Health Men who were deficient in vitamin D were twice as likely to have a heart attack as men who had adequate levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D Deficiency: A Global Concern If you live north of the line connecting San Francisco to Philadelphia and Athens to Beijing, odds are that you don’t get enough vitamin D. The same holds true if you don’t get outside for at least a 15-minute daily walk in the sun.… … Keep Reading

rose hips to reduce blood pressure heart disease

Rose Hips for Reducing Blood Pressure

Overall, the risk of cardiovascular disease was decreased by 17% in the rose hip group compared to the control group Life Extension (Originally in Nature) Michael Smith, M.D. Despite pharmaceutical profits of billions of dollars on heart medications, heart disease is still our number one killer. Although that topic is probably better suited for its own blog post, it sets the perfect stage for what we’re going to talk about here: a new study that explores the range of potential… … Keep Reading

Hibiscus tea to reduce blood pressure heartcurrents

Hibiscus Tea Can Lower Blood Pressure

The volunteers who drank hibiscus tea had a 7.2 point drop in their systolic blood pressure, compared to a 1.3 point drop in the volunteers who drank the placebo beverage United State Department of Agriculture –Rosalie Marion Bliss –November 10, 2008 Study Shows Consuming Hibiscus Tea Lowers Blood Pressure Drinking hibiscus tea lowered blood pressure in a group of pre-hypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults, according to a report being presented today by nutrition scientist Diane McKay at the American Heart… … Keep Reading

spices increase heart health

Spices and Heart Health

Cinnamon contains cinnamaldehyde, a phytochemical that may fight viruses, lower blood sugar and ward off diabetes, lower cholesterol, and protect against neurodegenerative diseases Harvard Health Letter February 2016 Can everyday spices make you healthier? The health benefits of foods such as berries, broccoli, and salmon are well known. But your kitchen’s spice rack may also hold some secret weapons against conditions such as inflammation, heart disease, cancer, and more. “Spices are underused, but it would be very easy to take… … Keep Reading

Swiss cheese heart disease heartcurrents

Cheese Consumption and Heart Disease

Overall, people who consumed high levels of cheese had a 14% lower risk of developing coronary heart disease and were 10% less likely to have a stroke than those who rarely or never ate cheese. Time Magazine Amanda McMillan December 5, 2017 Cheese is typically considered more of an indulgence than a health food, but a new review of research suggests that it may not be as bad for you as once thought. In fact, people in the analysis who… … Keep Reading

Body and Mind

stress pencil cortisol heart attack risk

Cortisol Levels Link Stress to Cardiac Risk

An elevated cortisol response to mental stress was linked to higher cardiac troponin T levels, suggesting that cortisol over-reactivity might explain why some people are more likely to develop heart disease.   MedPage Today June 27, 2013 Paul Cerrato,   Action Points This study evaluated the relationship between salivary cortisol response and cardiac troponin T plasma concentration in healthy older adults undergoing standardized mental stress tests. There was a significant association between heightened cortisol response to mental stress and detectable… … Keep Reading

heart attack ptsd one in eight

Heart Attacks Can Cause PTSD

Harvard Health Blog June 25, 2012 Holly Strawbridge Heart attack can trigger PTSD A heart attack is a life-changing event. For some people, surviving a heart attack brings renewed appreciation for life. For others, the event is so traumatic that worrying about having a second heart attack consumes their lives. By the latest account, 1 in 8 heart-attack survivors experiences a reaction that might be called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although PTSD is usually associated with extreme trauma such as… … Keep Reading

danger heart attack and stroke risk with anger

Anger, Heart Attack and Strokes

Although the risk of experiencing an acute cardiovascular event with any single outburst of anger is relatively low, the risk can accumulate for people with frequent episodes of anger. Harvard School of Public Health March, 2014 Angry outbursts appear to boost heart attack, stroke risk People who have angry outbursts appear to be at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, especially within the first two hours of an outburst, according to a study by Harvard School of Public Health… … Keep Reading

couple arguing heart attack anger heartcurrents

Intense Anger Increases Risk of Heart Attacks

Researchers found that in the 2 hours after a period of intense anger, the risk of heart attack may increase by 8.5 times. Medical News Today –February 25, 2017 –Honor Whiteman Angry outbursts may raise the risk of heart attack You have probably seen it in a number of films or TV shows: a character has an angry outburst before clutching their chest and falling to the ground – they are having a heart attack. But a new study shows… … Keep Reading

water dropping mindfulness heart disease heartcurrents

Mindfulness and the Reduction of Cardiovascular Risk Factors

Significant reduction was observed in symptoms of anxiety and depression, perceived stress, blood pressure, and body mass index in patients of the mindfulness based stress reduction group after the completion of intervention assessment. Mindfulness-based stress reduction program in coronary heart disease: A randomized control trial International Journal of Yoga 2013 6(2): 111–117 Background Psychological risk factors such as anxiety and depression have been associated with coronary heart disease (CHD). Stress can have an impact on the risk factors for the… … Keep Reading

Arthur Dove's The Red Sun heart disease

Depression Increases Risk Factors After a Heart Attack

One study found that the risk of death in heart attack survivors with depression was three times that of those without depression. –From Harvard Heart Letter –November, 2016– Depression and heart disease: A two-way street All people have days when they feel sad, gloomy, or down in the dumps. But if those feelings last for weeks and you gradually stop feeling hopeful or happy about anything in your life, you may have depression. Like heart disease, depression is common, so… … Keep Reading

Lifestyle

Sleep problems atrial fibrillation insomnia heartcurrents

Poor Sleep Linked to Increased Atrial Fibrillation

People diagnosed with insomnia had a 29 percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation compared to those without insomnia. PsychCentral Rick Nauert PhD Preliminary research suggests disruptions in sleep may raise the risk of an irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation (AF). Clinicians have known that obstructive sleep apnea, or sleep interrupted by pauses in breathing, is a known risk for atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to strokes, heart failure and other heart-related complications.… … Keep Reading

Dificulty sleeping heart problems heartcurrents

Sleep Problems and Heart Disease

Short sleep — less than six hours per night — appears to be especially hazardous to your heart health. Harvard Heart Letter  September 2017 Irregular or insufficient sleep increases your risk of cardiovascular disease. If you’re one of the many people who toss and turn nightly, you already know that a bout of sleeplessness can hamper your productivity and sap your quality of life. But the ramifications of poor sleep extend far beyond a cranky mood. Research shows that an… … Keep Reading

Synthetic Cannabis-like Drug Reduces Sleep Apnea

Six weeks of treatment by the highest dose of dronabinol (10 milligrams) was associated with a lower frequency of apneas or hypopneas (overly shallow breathing) during sleep. Science Daily November 28, 2017 A synthetic cannabis-like drug in a pill was safe and effective in treating obstructive sleep apnea in the first large multi-site study of a drug for apnea funded by the National Institutes of Health. The study was conducted at Northwestern Medicine and the University of Illinois at Chicago… … Keep Reading

Exercise Versus Statins for Reducing Heart Disease

IF you start taking a statin aged fifty, and keep taking it religiously for thirty years, you could expect to live for an extra: 6 x 4 days = 24 days. Or a bit less than a month. You may think this is worthwhile, you may not. This, by the way is the best-case scenario. On the other hand, it has been estimated that if you take regular exercise, you could live for an extra four and a half years.… … Keep Reading

Stamp outline vitamin b12 heartcurents

Mayo Clinic: Can taking Vitamin B12 Prevent Heart Disease?

There’s no evidence to show that vitamin B-12 supplements prevent heart disease. Mayo Clinic Staff Overview Vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) is a water-soluble vitamin that plays essential roles in red blood cell formation, cell metabolism, nerve function and the production of DNA. Food sources of vitamin B-12 include poultry, meat, fish and dairy products. Vitamin B-12 is also added to some foods and is available as an oral supplement. Vitamin B-12 injections or nasal spray might be prescribed to treat vitamin… … Keep Reading

bottle of vitamin d heart attacks heartcurrents

Vitamin D, Health and Heart Disease

Harvard School of Public Health Men who were deficient in vitamin D were twice as likely to have a heart attack as men who had adequate levels of vitamin D. Vitamin D Deficiency: A Global Concern If you live north of the line connecting San Francisco to Philadelphia and Athens to Beijing, odds are that you don’t get enough vitamin D. The same holds true if you don’t get outside for at least a 15-minute daily walk in the sun.… … Keep Reading

Research

chocolate intake atrial fibrillation heart currentes

Chocolate Intake and Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

Participants with higher levels of chocolate intake had a lower rate of clinically apparent incident AF or flutter. BMJ Journals — Volume 103, Issue 15 Chocolate intake and risk of clinically apparent atrial fibrillation: the Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health Study Elizabeth Mostofsky, Martin Berg Johansen, Anne Tjønneland Harpreet S Chahal, Murray A Mittleman, Kim Overvad Abstract Objective To evaluate the association between chocolate intake and incident clinically apparent atrial fibrillation or flutter (AF). Methods The Danish Diet, Cancer, and Health… … Keep Reading

chili peppers reduce cardiovascular mortality

Frequent Spicy Food Consumption Linked with Longer Lfe

People who eat spicy foods nearly every day have a 14% chance of living longer than those who consume spicy foods less than once a week, according to a new study Harvard School of Public Health –August 4, 2015 – Regular spicy food eaters also are less likely to die from cancer and heart and respiratory diseases than those who eat spicy foods infrequently. “The findings are highly novel,” said Lu Qi, associate professor in the Department of Nutrition at… … Keep Reading

does saturated fat clog heart arteries

Does Saturated Fat Clot Arteries?

Saturated Fat Does Not Clog the Arteries –Coronary Heart Disease Is a Chronic Inflammatory Condition, the Risk of Which Can Be Effectively Reduced From Healthy Lifestyle Interventions– –Abstract and Introduction– Coronary artery disease pathogenesis and treatment urgently requires a paradigm shift. Despite popular belief among doctors and the public, the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong. A landmark systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies showed no association between saturated fat consumption and… … Keep Reading

crestor-cardiac-heart-statins-Cochrane review

Cochrane Review: Statins are Effective Even Without Indications of Cardiovascular Disease

Conclusion Of 1000 people treated with a statin for five years, 18 would avoid a major CVD event which compares well with other treatments used for preventing cardiovascular disease. Taking statins did not increase the risk of serious adverse effects such as cancer. Statins are likely to be cost-effective in primary prevention. Reductions in all-cause mortality, major vascular events and revascularisations were found with no excess of adverse events among people without evidence of CVD treated with statins. Abstract Cardiovascular… … Keep Reading

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Blood Pressure Targets for Hypertension in Older Adults

Review question What is the optimal blood pressure (BP) target when treating older adults with high blood pressure? Background Elevated BP in older adults is common and higher pressures increase the risk of adverse health events such as stroke, heart attack, heart failure, and death. Lowering BP with drugs has been shown to reduce the risk of these serious health events but the optimal BP target when treating older adults is not known. Study characteristics We systematically retrieved all randomised… … Keep Reading

Coffee Consumption and Health

Coffee consumption seems generally safe within usual levels of intake. Introduction Coffee is one of the most commonly consumed beverages worldwide. As such, even small individual health effects could be important on a population scale. There have been mixed conclusions as to whether coffee consumption is beneficial or harmful to health, and this varies between outcomes. Roasted coffee is a complex mixture of over 1000 bioactive compounds, some with potentially therapeutic antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, or anticancer effects that provide biological… … Keep Reading

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Mayo Clinic: Can taking Vitamin B12 Prevent Heart Disease?

There’s no evidence to show that vitamin B-12 supplements prevent heart disease. Mayo Clinic Staff Overview Vitamin B-12 (cobalamin) is a water-soluble vitamin that plays essential roles in red blood cell formation, cell metabolism, nerve function and the production of DNA. Food sources of vitamin B-12 include poultry, meat, fish and dairy products. Vitamin B-12 is also added to some foods and is available as an oral supplement. Vitamin B-12 injections or nasal spray might be prescribed to treat vitamin… … Keep Reading

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Heart Attacks Can Cause PTSD

Harvard Health Blog June 25, 2012 Holly Strawbridge Heart attack can trigger PTSD A heart attack is a life-changing event. For some people, surviving a heart attack brings renewed appreciation for life. For others, the event is so traumatic that worrying about having a second heart attack consumes their lives. By the latest account, 1 in 8 heart-attack survivors experiences a reaction that might be called post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Although PTSD is usually associated with extreme trauma such as… … Keep Reading

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Spices and Heart Health

Cinnamon contains cinnamaldehyde, a phytochemical that may fight viruses, lower blood sugar and ward off diabetes, lower cholesterol, and protect against neurodegenerative diseases Harvard Health Letter February 2016 Can everyday spices make you healthier? The health benefits of foods such as berries, broccoli, and salmon are well known. But your kitchen’s spice rack may also hold some secret weapons against conditions such as inflammation, heart disease, cancer, and more. “Spices are underused, but it would be very easy to take… … Keep Reading

Triglyceride Levels and Cardiovascular Risk

Triglyceride levels above 150 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) are associated with a higher cardiovascular risk. Harvard Men’s Heath Watch –June, 2015 Know your triglycerides: The level of triglycerides in the blood, like measurements of “bad” cholesterol, helps to gauge your risk for heart disease. High levels of these fatty particles in the blood means you may need to step up healthy lifestyle changes. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL), or “bad” cholesterol, invades the artery walls and causes atherosclerosis, the buildup of fatty… … Keep Reading

Is It Safe to Take Low Does Aspirin?

Harvard Men’s Health Watch October, 2012 Is low-dose aspirin safe for you? If you take daily aspirin, make sure you know why and understand the small but real bleeding risk. Are you taking an aspirin a day to keep the cardiologist away? If so, you are among millions of Americans taking a daily dose of the cheap, widely available anti-inflammatory drug for “primary prevention” of cardiovascular disease. Primary prevention means you don’t have cardiovascular disease, and hope that aspirin will… … Keep Reading

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Anger, Heart Attack and Strokes

Although the risk of experiencing an acute cardiovascular event with any single outburst of anger is relatively low, the risk can accumulate for people with frequent episodes of anger. Harvard School of Public Health March, 2014 Angry outbursts appear to boost heart attack, stroke risk People who have angry outbursts appear to be at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, especially within the first two hours of an outburst, according to a study by Harvard School of Public Health… … Keep Reading

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