);    

Genes and Coffee: Slow-Metabolizers

40 percent of people are fast metabolizers. About 45 percent have both a slow and a fast copy, and 15 percent carry two copies of the slow allele. Heavy coffee consumption (more than four cups day) was  linked to a higher likelihood of heart attacks in the slow metabolizers. Highlights For Coffee Drinkers, the Buzz May Be in Your Genes The health community can’t quite agree on whether coffee is more potion or poison. The American Heart Association says the… … Keep Reading

Comparing Diets — It’s Real Food That’s Important

A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention. Highlights Science Compared Every Diet, and the Winner Is Real Food Researchers asked if one diet could be crowned best in terms of health outcomes. If diet is a set of rigid principles, the answer is a decisive no. In terms of broader guidelines, it’s a decisive yes. Scientific publisher Annual Reviews asked Katz to compare the medical evidence for… … Keep Reading

Heart Health Knowledge Among Americans

Fewer than half of Americans knew back or jaw pain and nausea/vomiting can be heart attack indicators. Highlights Only Half Of Americans Say They Know CPR The results reveal Americans also confuse heart attack & stroke symptoms A online survey conducted conducted by the Cleveland Clinic among a national probability dual-sample consisting of 1,007 adults, 470 men and 537 women 18 years of age and older found the folowing:  –Slightly more than half of Americans (fifty four percent) say they know… … Keep Reading

Heart Attack Symptoms: Call an Ambulance Immediately — Do Not Drive to the Hospital

Don’t assume all you have been told is all you need to know. One of the statements I came across when researching the material for this website is “Don’t assume all you have been told is all you need to know.” Incredibly, although I had had three stents and obviously was at risk of a heart attack, not a single provider – and we are talking numerous hospital visits — made sure I understood what the symptoms of a heart… … Keep Reading

Women’s Decision Making Patterns During Heart Attack Symptoms

Reluctance to call 911 was a major theme in many stories regardless of the patterns of decision making. Educating women and their physicians about interpreting the symptoms of myocardial infarction remains a significant obstacle in reducing decision time. Highlights Understanding Treatment-Seeking Delay in Women with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Descriptions of Decision-Making Patterns In this qualitative study, 52 women were asked in semi-structured interviews to describe the symptoms and related thoughts, decisions, and actions from the onset of symptoms of myocardial… … Keep Reading

Women’s Delay in Getting to Hospital Doubles Their Risk of Mortality

 Women were nearly twice as likely to die in the hospital compared with men, with in-hospital deaths reported for 12 percent of women and 6 percent of men in the study. Women Don’t Get to Hospital Fast Enough During Heart Attack Pre-hospital delays remain unacceptably long in women, and time matters,” said Raffaele Bugiardini, M.D., professor of cardiology, University of Bologna, Italy, and lead author of the study, which examined records of 7,457 European patients enrolled from 2010 to 2014… … Keep Reading

Heart Disease Risk in Women

 Many women say their physicians never talk to them about coronary risk and sometimes don’t even recognize the symptoms, mistaking them instead for signs of panic disorder, stress, and even hypochondria.  Highlights  Gender matters: Heart disease risk in women In a survey conducted by the American Heart Association, about half of the women interviewed knew that heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, yet only 13% said it was their greatest personal health risk. Top heart attack… … Keep Reading

What are my odds of dying from heart disease?

  Heart Disease in the United States About 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year–that’s 1 in every 4 deaths.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women.   Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of heart disease, killing over 370,000 people annually. Every year about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack. Of these, 525,000 are a first heart attack and 210,000 happen in people who have already had a heart attack. Center for Disease Control and… … Keep Reading

Nudging People Towards Cardiac Rehab

Changing the referral process for cardiac rehabilitation to opt-out rather than opt-in caused referral rates to jump from 12 percent to 75 percent in nine months at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Hospital ‘nudges’ providers to increase cardiac rehab referral by 63% Highlights “We started bringing cardiac rehab into our conversations with patients and adding it to discharge documentation and conversations following discharge as well. Now this is part of our daily workflow.” The project was part of… … Keep Reading

Computer Versus Human in Interpreting Echocardiograms

On single still images drawn from all 15 views, the model achieved an average overall accuracy of 91.7 percent  compared to an average of 79.4 percent for board-certified echocardiograpers classifying a subset of the same test images.   Highlights Computers Are More Accurate Than Echocardiographers in Interpreting Echocardiograms Imaging is a critical part of medical diagnosis; Interpreting medical images typically requires extensive training and practice and is a complex and time-intensive process Deep learning, specifically using convolutional neural networks (CNNs), is… … Keep Reading

Vitamin D-3 and Reducing The Risk of Heart Disease

Crystals of Vitamin D Vitamin D3 – which is made by the body naturally when skin is exposed to the sun – can significantly restore the damage to the cardiovascular system caused by several diseases, including hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Highlights Patients who have a heart attack often will have a deficiency of D3. (It doesn’t mean that the deficiency caused the heart attack, but it increased the risk of heart attack.) Vitamin D3 is a powerful stimulator of nitric… … Keep Reading

Height and Heart Disease Risk

  Lower than Average Height Increases Risk of Heart Disease   Highlights For every 2.5 inches below average height, risk of heart disease increased about 14 percent; this was more pronounced in men than women.  200,000 people in the United Kingdom were studied. For every 2.5 inches below average height, risk of heart disease increased about 14 percent; this was more pronounced in men than women.   The risk of getting heart disease due to your height is much less than… … Keep Reading

MEDICATIONS

Most Diagnostic Tests Miss Heart Attacks

63% of the myocardial infarctions identified by cardiosvacular medical imaging were missed in routine medical care,  Highlights Most Heart Attacks Are Missed in Routine Medical Care Unrecognzed heart attacks  refer to sub-clinical events that are missed in routine medical care but are picked up by electrocardiogram (ECG) or by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging, which is more accurate. 63% (156 out of 247) of the myocardial infarctions identified by CMR were missed in routine medical care,” said Dr Acharya. “Unrecognized… … Keep Reading

Statins-danger-weight-gain-heartcurrents

Statins and Weight Gain

Individuals prescribed statin therapy for high cholesterol levels have increased their caloric intake by nearly 10% and their intake of fat by 14% over a recent 10-year period, while no changes in eating habits have been observed among statin nonusers.  Highlights Individuals prescribed a statin had a larger increase in body-mass index (BMI) than those who weren’t taking the lipid-lowering medication. Statin users were consuming an extra 192 kcal per day in 2009–2010 than they were in 1999–2000, and this… … Keep Reading

atrial-fibrillation-strokes-blood-thinners-heartcurrents

Atrial Fibrillation, Strokes and Blood Thinners

  On average, people with AFib are 5 times more likely to suffer a stroke than those with a normal heartbeat CardioSmart      American College of Cardiology Understanding Risks of Stroke and Blood Thinners If you have atrial fibrillation (AFib), your heart beats irregularly. As a result, your heart has a harder time pumping blood out and to the body. When this happens, blood can pool in the heart and form clots. If a blood clot travels through the… … Keep Reading

HEART ATTACK INFO

Genes and Coffee: Slow-Metabolizers

40 percent of people are fast metabolizers. About 45 percent have both a slow and a fast copy, and 15 percent carry two copies of the slow allele. Heavy coffee consumption (more than four cups day) was  linked to a higher likelihood of heart attacks in the slow metabolizers. Highlights For Coffee Drinkers, the Buzz May Be in Your Genes The health community can’t quite agree on whether coffee is more potion or poison. The American Heart Association says the… … Keep Reading

Heart Health Knowledge Among Americans

Fewer than half of Americans knew back or jaw pain and nausea/vomiting can be heart attack indicators. Highlights Only Half Of Americans Say They Know CPR The results reveal Americans also confuse heart attack & stroke symptoms A online survey conducted conducted by the Cleveland Clinic among a national probability dual-sample consisting of 1,007 adults, 470 men and 537 women 18 years of age and older found the folowing:  –Slightly more than half of Americans (fifty four percent) say they know… … Keep Reading

Heart Attack Symptoms: Call an Ambulance Immediately — Do Not Drive to the Hospital

Don’t assume all you have been told is all you need to know. One of the statements I came across when researching the material for this website is “Don’t assume all you have been told is all you need to know.” Incredibly, although I had had three stents and obviously was at risk of a heart attack, not a single provider – and we are talking numerous hospital visits — made sure I understood what the symptoms of a heart… … Keep Reading

Women’s Decision Making Patterns During Heart Attack Symptoms

Reluctance to call 911 was a major theme in many stories regardless of the patterns of decision making. Educating women and their physicians about interpreting the symptoms of myocardial infarction remains a significant obstacle in reducing decision time. Highlights Understanding Treatment-Seeking Delay in Women with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Descriptions of Decision-Making Patterns In this qualitative study, 52 women were asked in semi-structured interviews to describe the symptoms and related thoughts, decisions, and actions from the onset of symptoms of myocardial… … Keep Reading

Women’s Delay in Getting to Hospital Doubles Their Risk of Mortality

 Women were nearly twice as likely to die in the hospital compared with men, with in-hospital deaths reported for 12 percent of women and 6 percent of men in the study. Women Don’t Get to Hospital Fast Enough During Heart Attack Pre-hospital delays remain unacceptably long in women, and time matters,” said Raffaele Bugiardini, M.D., professor of cardiology, University of Bologna, Italy, and lead author of the study, which examined records of 7,457 European patients enrolled from 2010 to 2014… … Keep Reading

Five Early Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

Highlights Early Warnings Symptoms of a Heart Attack Dr. O’Keefe-McCarthy cited a number of previous studies that have suggested women tend to experience more warning symptoms compared with men. Women tend to experience less prodromal chest pain, but reported more episodes of fatigue, anxiety, and head-related symptoms such as headache or dizziness compared with their male counterparts. Dr. McSweeney and her colleagues identified the five specific prodromal symptoms that appear to be most predictive of future cardiac events: –Unusual fatigue –Discomfort in… … Keep Reading

Nutrition

Genes and Coffee: Slow-Metabolizers

40 percent of people are fast metabolizers. About 45 percent have both a slow and a fast copy, and 15 percent carry two copies of the slow allele. Heavy coffee consumption (more than four cups day) was  linked to a higher likelihood of heart attacks in the slow metabolizers. Highlights For Coffee Drinkers, the Buzz May Be in Your Genes The health community can’t quite agree on whether coffee is more potion or poison. The American Heart Association says the… … Keep Reading

Comparing Diets — It’s Real Food That’s Important

A diet of minimally processed foods close to nature, predominantly plants, is decisively associated with health promotion and disease prevention. Highlights Science Compared Every Diet, and the Winner Is Real Food Researchers asked if one diet could be crowned best in terms of health outcomes. If diet is a set of rigid principles, the answer is a decisive no. In terms of broader guidelines, it’s a decisive yes. Scientific publisher Annual Reviews asked Katz to compare the medical evidence for… … Keep Reading

Vitamin D-3 and Reducing The Risk of Heart Disease

Crystals of Vitamin D Vitamin D3 – which is made by the body naturally when skin is exposed to the sun – can significantly restore the damage to the cardiovascular system caused by several diseases, including hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Highlights Patients who have a heart attack often will have a deficiency of D3. (It doesn’t mean that the deficiency caused the heart attack, but it increased the risk of heart attack.) Vitamin D3 is a powerful stimulator of nitric… … Keep Reading

Statins-danger-weight-gain-heartcurrents

Statins and Weight Gain

Individuals prescribed statin therapy for high cholesterol levels have increased their caloric intake by nearly 10% and their intake of fat by 14% over a recent 10-year period, while no changes in eating habits have been observed among statin nonusers.  Highlights Individuals prescribed a statin had a larger increase in body-mass index (BMI) than those who weren’t taking the lipid-lowering medication. Statin users were consuming an extra 192 kcal per day in 2009–2010 than they were in 1999–2000, and this… … Keep Reading

Heart Healthy Habits of Physicians heartcurewnts

Heart Healthy Habits: Doctors

   Highlights   45 Things Doctors Do to Protect Their Own Hearts     “I get 8 hours of sleep a night, every night.” “I schedule exercise.”  “I eat a Mediterranean diet.”  “I make time for my friends and loved ones.” “I meditate.” “I respect the power of blood pressure.” “I take care of my teeth”  “I keep a gratitude journal.” “I spend time in outdoors, in nature.”   Read More: Reader’s Digest Charlotte Hilton Andersen Dr. Parker’s Commentary As… … Keep Reading

cardiovascular-risk-extra-virgin-olive-oil

Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Heart Health

  Higher baseline total olive oil consumption was associated with 48%  reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality.   Highlights from the article:  Olive Oil Intake and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality The aim  of the study was to assess the association between total olive oil intake, its varieties (extra virgin and common olive oil) and the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. 7,216 men and women at high cardiovascular risk, aged 55… … Keep Reading

Body and Mind

Women’s Decision Making Patterns During Heart Attack Symptoms

Reluctance to call 911 was a major theme in many stories regardless of the patterns of decision making. Educating women and their physicians about interpreting the symptoms of myocardial infarction remains a significant obstacle in reducing decision time. Highlights Understanding Treatment-Seeking Delay in Women with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Descriptions of Decision-Making Patterns In this qualitative study, 52 women were asked in semi-structured interviews to describe the symptoms and related thoughts, decisions, and actions from the onset of symptoms of myocardial… … Keep Reading

Women’s Delay in Getting to Hospital Doubles Their Risk of Mortality

 Women were nearly twice as likely to die in the hospital compared with men, with in-hospital deaths reported for 12 percent of women and 6 percent of men in the study. Women Don’t Get to Hospital Fast Enough During Heart Attack Pre-hospital delays remain unacceptably long in women, and time matters,” said Raffaele Bugiardini, M.D., professor of cardiology, University of Bologna, Italy, and lead author of the study, which examined records of 7,457 European patients enrolled from 2010 to 2014… … Keep Reading

Heart Disease Risk in Women

 Many women say their physicians never talk to them about coronary risk and sometimes don’t even recognize the symptoms, mistaking them instead for signs of panic disorder, stress, and even hypochondria.  Highlights  Gender matters: Heart disease risk in women In a survey conducted by the American Heart Association, about half of the women interviewed knew that heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, yet only 13% said it was their greatest personal health risk. Top heart attack… … Keep Reading

Five Early Warning Signs of a Heart Attack

Highlights Early Warnings Symptoms of a Heart Attack Dr. O’Keefe-McCarthy cited a number of previous studies that have suggested women tend to experience more warning symptoms compared with men. Women tend to experience less prodromal chest pain, but reported more episodes of fatigue, anxiety, and head-related symptoms such as headache or dizziness compared with their male counterparts. Dr. McSweeney and her colleagues identified the five specific prodromal symptoms that appear to be most predictive of future cardiac events: –Unusual fatigue –Discomfort in… … Keep Reading

stress-worry-heart-attack-heartcurrents

Financial Stress Greatly Increases Heart Attack Risk

  People who reported significant financial stress were 13 times more likely to have a heart attack than those who had minimal or no stress.   Highlights Financial worries may raise heart attack risk by 13-fold The study included 106 people who had checked into a large public hospital in Johannesburg for a heart attack; The researchers also examined a control group of 106 healthy, age-, sex-, and race-matched participants. As much as 96 percent of those who had had a heart… … Keep Reading

Lifestyle

cardiovascular-risk-extra-virgin-olive-oil

Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Heart Health

  Higher baseline total olive oil consumption was associated with 48%  reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality.   Highlights from the article:  Olive Oil Intake and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality The aim  of the study was to assess the association between total olive oil intake, its varieties (extra virgin and common olive oil) and the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. 7,216 men and women at high cardiovascular risk, aged 55… … Keep Reading

beethoven-music-atrial-fibrillation-heartcurrents

Beethoven, the Heart and Arrhytmias

In highly charged passages of certain pieces, the possibility of cardiac arrhythmia can lend a quite physical aspect to one’s interpretation of the music in question. These passages can seem, in an unexpectedly literal sense, to be heartfelt. Highlights Whether or not music stirs inside, each of us bears a living metronome at our core.   The human heart quietly marks the rhythm of our lives. A new study focusing on the music of Ludwig van Beethoven treats shifting musical rhythms… … Keep Reading

healing-art-program-University-of-Washinton-heartcurrents

Doing It Right: Arts Program at the University of Washington Medical Center

 Viewing and creating art, as well as listening to music, play an important role in mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health.     University of Washington Welcome to the Arts Program at University of Washington Medical Center Art is everywhere in our world and art is essential. Viewing and creating art, as well as listening to music, play an important role in mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health. A growing body of evidence indicates that the presence of artwork, artists… … Keep Reading

Art-As-Healing-Art-As-Medicine

Can Art Be Medicine? — A Short Film —

From the Foundation for Art and Healing Can Art be Medicine? Whether through expressive writing, music, movement or visual media, all the arts are able to change people’s perspectives, moods, relationships and overall health. As we study the science of creative expression as a path to healing, and put it into action through our initiatives, we also work toward broadening awareness of the power of art to discover, explore and share what is most important to us as individuals and… … Keep Reading

Art heals cardiologist artist Paul Kolker heartcurrents

The Physician as Artist: Paul Kolker, M.D.

Dr. Kolker relates, from personal experience and through observing patients, how introducing any form of creative expression—visual arts, music, literature—enhances convalescence. Simply put, patients feel better faster. Dr. Kolker, The Physician as Artist, The Artist as Physician In this video, Paul Kolker, M.D., J.D., an accomplished cardiovascular surgeon, attorney, and noted visual artist, shares a wide array of experiences that spotlight the impact the arts have had on his medical training and career, his interactions with his cardiac patients, and… … Keep Reading

art-as-healing-medicine-UCSF-Heartcurrents

Art and Healing

“The truth comes out when I’m painting,” said Parisotto.   University of California, San Francisco –Kathleen Masterson and Suzanne Leigh –December 8, 2014– The Art of Healing The idea of art as medicine dates back to antiquity, but recently the concept is drawing increasing interest from the medical and science communities. “Sometimes I don’t even know what I’m thinking until I sit down and start drawing. Then my feelings come out on paper,” said Suzuki, a teacher in remission from… … Keep Reading

HEART DISEASE

Heart Health Knowledge Among Americans

Fewer than half of Americans knew back or jaw pain and nausea/vomiting can be heart attack indicators. Highlights Only Half Of Americans Say They Know CPR The results reveal Americans also confuse heart attack & stroke symptoms A online survey conducted conducted by the Cleveland Clinic among a national probability dual-sample consisting of 1,007 adults, 470 men and 537 women 18 years of age and older found the folowing:  –Slightly more than half of Americans (fifty four percent) say they know… … Keep Reading

Heart Disease Risk in Women

 Many women say their physicians never talk to them about coronary risk and sometimes don’t even recognize the symptoms, mistaking them instead for signs of panic disorder, stress, and even hypochondria.  Highlights  Gender matters: Heart disease risk in women In a survey conducted by the American Heart Association, about half of the women interviewed knew that heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, yet only 13% said it was their greatest personal health risk. Top heart attack… … Keep Reading

What are my odds of dying from heart disease?

  Heart Disease in the United States About 610,000 people die of heart disease in the United States every year–that’s 1 in every 4 deaths.  Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women.   Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of heart disease, killing over 370,000 people annually. Every year about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack. Of these, 525,000 are a first heart attack and 210,000 happen in people who have already had a heart attack. Center for Disease Control and… … Keep Reading

Nudging People Towards Cardiac Rehab

Changing the referral process for cardiac rehabilitation to opt-out rather than opt-in caused referral rates to jump from 12 percent to 75 percent in nine months at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Hospital ‘nudges’ providers to increase cardiac rehab referral by 63% Highlights “We started bringing cardiac rehab into our conversations with patients and adding it to discharge documentation and conversations following discharge as well. Now this is part of our daily workflow.” The project was part of… … Keep Reading

Height and Heart Disease Risk

  Lower than Average Height Increases Risk of Heart Disease   Highlights For every 2.5 inches below average height, risk of heart disease increased about 14 percent; this was more pronounced in men than women.  200,000 people in the United Kingdom were studied. For every 2.5 inches below average height, risk of heart disease increased about 14 percent; this was more pronounced in men than women.   The risk of getting heart disease due to your height is much less than… … Keep Reading

How Does High Altitude Affect People with Heart Problems?

Highlights High Altitude Exposure Among People With Cardiovascular Conditions   Physiological acclimatization to altitude can impose an increased workload on the cardiovascular system. At high altitudes, considered those higher than 2500 m (~8200 ft) above sea level, physiologic responses may start to represent challenges for the human body. High altitude is associated with progressive reduction in barometric pressure, air temperature, and humidity. A reduction in barometric pressure results in “hypobaric hypoxia.” High altitude is associated with increases in systemic blood… … Keep Reading

AFIB

Atrial Fibrillation, Stroke and Colder Temperatures

Compared to summer, the risk of ischaemic stroke increased by 10% in spring and 19% in winter. Highlights Cold Weather and Stroke Risk from Atrial Fibrillation Until now it was unclear whether the risk of ischaemic stroke was higher in AF patients during cool seasons or on days with a lower temperature; The study investigated this issue in 28 ,559 new-onset AF patients from the “National Health Insurance Research Database” inTaiwan during 2000 to 2011. The risk of ischaemic stroke was… … Keep Reading

beethoven-music-atrial-fibrillation-heartcurrents

Beethoven, the Heart and Arrhytmias

In highly charged passages of certain pieces, the possibility of cardiac arrhythmia can lend a quite physical aspect to one’s interpretation of the music in question. These passages can seem, in an unexpectedly literal sense, to be heartfelt. Highlights Whether or not music stirs inside, each of us bears a living metronome at our core.   The human heart quietly marks the rhythm of our lives. A new study focusing on the music of Ludwig van Beethoven treats shifting musical rhythms… … Keep Reading

atrial-fibrillation-strokes-blood-thinners-heartcurrents

Atrial Fibrillation, Strokes and Blood Thinners

  On average, people with AFib are 5 times more likely to suffer a stroke than those with a normal heartbeat CardioSmart      American College of Cardiology Understanding Risks of Stroke and Blood Thinners If you have atrial fibrillation (AFib), your heart beats irregularly. As a result, your heart has a harder time pumping blood out and to the body. When this happens, blood can pool in the heart and form clots. If a blood clot travels through the… … Keep Reading

ART

beethoven-music-atrial-fibrillation-heartcurrents

Beethoven, the Heart and Arrhytmias

In highly charged passages of certain pieces, the possibility of cardiac arrhythmia can lend a quite physical aspect to one’s interpretation of the music in question. These passages can seem, in an unexpectedly literal sense, to be heartfelt. Highlights Whether or not music stirs inside, each of us bears a living metronome at our core.   The human heart quietly marks the rhythm of our lives. A new study focusing on the music of Ludwig van Beethoven treats shifting musical rhythms… … Keep Reading

healing-art-program-University-of-Washinton-heartcurrents

Doing It Right: Arts Program at the University of Washington Medical Center

 Viewing and creating art, as well as listening to music, play an important role in mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health.     University of Washington Welcome to the Arts Program at University of Washington Medical Center Art is everywhere in our world and art is essential. Viewing and creating art, as well as listening to music, play an important role in mental, physical, emotional and spiritual health. A growing body of evidence indicates that the presence of artwork, artists… … Keep Reading

Art-As-Healing-Art-As-Medicine

Can Art Be Medicine? — A Short Film —

From the Foundation for Art and Healing Can Art be Medicine? Whether through expressive writing, music, movement or visual media, all the arts are able to change people’s perspectives, moods, relationships and overall health. As we study the science of creative expression as a path to healing, and put it into action through our initiatives, we also work toward broadening awareness of the power of art to discover, explore and share what is most important to us as individuals and… … Keep Reading

Art heals cardiologist artist Paul Kolker heartcurrents

The Physician as Artist: Paul Kolker, M.D.

Dr. Kolker relates, from personal experience and through observing patients, how introducing any form of creative expression—visual arts, music, literature—enhances convalescence. Simply put, patients feel better faster. Dr. Kolker, The Physician as Artist, The Artist as Physician In this video, Paul Kolker, M.D., J.D., an accomplished cardiovascular surgeon, attorney, and noted visual artist, shares a wide array of experiences that spotlight the impact the arts have had on his medical training and career, his interactions with his cardiac patients, and… … Keep Reading

art-as-healing-medicine-UCSF-Heartcurrents

Art and Healing

“The truth comes out when I’m painting,” said Parisotto.   University of California, San Francisco –Kathleen Masterson and Suzanne Leigh –December 8, 2014– The Art of Healing The idea of art as medicine dates back to antiquity, but recently the concept is drawing increasing interest from the medical and science communities. “Sometimes I don’t even know what I’m thinking until I sit down and start drawing. Then my feelings come out on paper,” said Suzuki, a teacher in remission from… … Keep Reading

Depression Reduced by Art Therapy

  After ten treatments the patients who suffered from severe or moderately severe depression had shown more improvement than the patients in the control group.   Highlights Art Therapy Reduces Severe Depression  As part Dr. Christina Blomdahl’s dissertation,  43 patients with severe or moderately severe depression underwent a manual-based art therapy.  The control group consisted of 36 people who all suffered from the same medical condition. All participants were given different combinations of medication, cognitive behavioral therapy, psychodynamic therapy and… … Keep Reading

Go to Top