Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Heart Health

cardiovascular-risk-extra-virgin-olive-oil

  Higher baseline total olive oil consumption was associated with 48%  reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality.

 

Highlights from the article: 

Olive Oil Intake and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality

The aim  of the study was to assess the association between total olive oil intake, its varieties (extra virgin and common olive oil) and the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk.

7,216 men and women at high cardiovascular risk, aged 55 to 80 years were followed for 4.8 years 

Higher baseline total olive oil consumption was associated with 48% reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality.

For each 10 g/d increase in extra-virgin olive oil consumption, cardiovascular disease and mortality risk decreased by 10% and 7%, respectively 

Olive oil consumption, specifically the extra-virgin variety, is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and mortality in individuals at high cardiovascular risk.

 

Read more:

Olive oil intake and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in the PREDIMED Study

BMC Medicine

 May 13, 2014

Dr. Parker’s Commentary

The problem with this study, and so many others, is that correlation is not cause and effect.   

The Methods section in the full article reads:  “As compared with participants in the lowest tertile of total olive oil intake, those in the highest tertile were more likely to have secondary education, lower total energy intake, lower consumption of red meat and dairy products, and also to drink less alcohol.” 

 The lowered consumption of red meat and dairy products by folks who used lots of extra virgin olive oil may have contributed to the lower risk factors, as an example.

Nevertheless, I will be using extra virgin olive oil.  Even a 1% reduction is helpful.

 

” I first coined ‘EVOO’ on my cooking show because saying ‘extra virgin olive oil’ over and over was wordy, and I’m an impatient girl – that’s why I make 30-minute meals!”

 Rachael Ray

Dr. Parker is a 68 year old heart attack survivor and cardiac psychologist. He is an Honors graduate of Stanford University with forty years of clinical experience. Dr. Parker is available for consultation on heart matters. Contact him at heartcurrents(at)gmail.com.