Height and Heart Disease Risk

napoleon-height-heart-disease-risk

 

Lower than Average Height Increases Risk of Heart Disease

 

Highlights

For every 2.5 inches below average height, risk of heart disease increased about 14 percent; this was more pronounced in men than women. 

200,000 people in the United Kingdom were studied.

For every 2.5 inches below average height, risk of heart disease increased about 14 percent; this was more pronounced in men than women.  

The risk of getting heart disease due to your height is much less than the risk due to smoking or having high cholesterol.

 Approximately 19% of the observed association between a genetically determined decrease in height and an increased risk of CAD could be explained by the effect of shorter height on LDL cholesterol and approximately 12% by an effect on triglycerides. 

 

Genetically Determined Height and Coronary Artery Disease

New England Journal of Medicine

April 23, 2015

Additional reading: 

Link Between Heart Disease And Height Hidden In Our Genes 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Dr. Parker’s Commentary

The headlines and some of the write-ups on this article seemed to imply that the taller one is the less risk on has for coronary artery disease; reading the findings more closely, this only applies to people who  are shorter than average, not taller than average.

Additionally, and the authors of the research note this, that the primary group studied as Caucasian.  One has to be careful of applying research findings and averages to individuals and to races.  

 

  “I said you ain’t so big, you’re just tall that’s all.”

 Elvis Presley, Big Boss Man

 

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Dr. Parker is a 68 year old heart attack survivor and cardiac psychologist. He is an Honors graduate of Stanford University with forty years of clinical experience. Dr. Parker is available for consultation on heart matters. Contact him at heartcurrents(at)gmail.com.